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Whether you're preparing for recertification, renewing your license, or just want to stay current, the AORN Journal Continuing Education (CE) articles address a variety of perioperative topics. From Guidelines implementation to perioperative safe practices, stay up-to-date and improve your own practice every day.

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February 2018 Issue

This February issue include a CE article on improving health care worker safety for staff members who are exposed to the hazardous drugs mitomycin C and fluorouracil, which are commonly used for nononcologic ophthalmologic procedures; and another CE article on whether the use of perioperative prebiotics, probiotics, and synbiotics in patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery improves the incidence of infectious complications and inflammatory response outcomes. The Clinical Issues column explores fecal microbiota transplant, the Zika virus, autologous bone flap transfer, counting microsuture, and iodine allergy.

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AORN Journal February 2018 Issue

Featured CE Articles

Applying Hazardous Drug Standards to Antineoplastics Used for Ophthalmology Surgery

Studies have revealed widespread environmental contamination with hazardous drug residue in hospitals, clinics, and pharmacies. The hazardous drugs mitomycin C and fluorouracil are commonly used for nononcologic ophthalmologic procedures, and staff members who are exposed to these medications are potentially at risk for acute complications. New regulations by the US Pharmacopeial Convention will have a substantial effect on improving health care worker safety and may require changes in practice for clinicians in ophthalmic ORs and procedure areas.

The Effect of Prebiotics, Probiotics, and Synbiotics on Infection After Colorectal Cancer Surgery

Some studies show that use of prebiotics, probiotics, and synbiotics perioperatively in gastrointestinal surgeries results in a faster return of gut motility, decreased infection rates, and reduced postoperative complications. We evaluated the literature to determine whether the use of these microorganisms perioperatively in patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery improves the incidence of infectious complications and inflammatory response outcomes. The studies’ findings showed conflicting results regarding their effect on the rate of postoperative infectious complications, and showed no effect on systemic inflammatory response.

Clinical Issues—February 2018

This month’s Q&A column addresses the following topics: documenting a fecal microbiota transplant, transmission of the Zika virus, transferring cranial bone flaps, counting microsuture, and choosing antiseptics to use when prepping a patient with an iodine allergy.

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