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Letters & Emails
Defining ???high-definition???
Zzz Zzz
Publish Date: October 10, 2007

RMV->) Re: "Getting a Clear Picture of HDTV" (February, page 42). Any article that gets people thinking about the facts will benefit the industry, but it's clear to me how cloudy people's understanding of the terms high definition and HDTV is. Medical imaging companies have done a good job of making customers associate the term HD with HDTV. Consumers associate the term with what they're experiencing at home watching their TV. Unfortunately, although a successful marketing ploy, it is purely misleading.

HDTV, as the customer knows, is what the Super Bowl is broadcast in. The medical consumer must understand that HDTV is the highest broadcast standard available today, defined as 1920x1080 pixels. This is the only true standard when defining image quality from a pure technology perspective. As the article states, everything in the chain matters. If you use an inferior monitor, it doesn't matter how good your camera is.

Buyer beware. Check the facts. Make sure you put all parts of the optical chain through real-life situations when evaluating a potential product line. Don't simply take the rep's word for it.

Steve Jones
Director of Business Development
Arthrex
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RNs Pushing Propofol
Re: "Are You Prepared for the Colonoscopy Boom?" (January, page 57). We, too, use short-acting anesthetics, but our nurses push Diprivan (propofol). We use fentanyl or versed only if there is an allergy to eggs and or soy. Our patient satisfaction is very high. Patients are pleased at how fast they wake up. They also love the fact that they're not nauseated post-procedure.

Heather Lorenz, RN
Charge Nurse
Providence-Medford Medical Center - Endoscopy
Medford, Ore.
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Phakic IOLs Another Option
Re: "Should You Add Phakic IOLs?" (February, page 51). This is a timely article. More and more options are available and it's nice to know that our surgery center can be prompting physicians about the possibility of introducing this new technology.

Greg Rawley, RN, BS, CNOR
Manager, Staff Education and Program Development
The Center for Surgery
Naperville, Ill.
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Keep "Behind Closed Doors" There
As an old OR nurse myself, I agree with Paula Watkins's take on OR life. However, as a manager, I can only hope no one ever places Outpatient Surgery Magazine in their waiting rooms. Frightening.

Rebecca Bennett, RN
Management Consultant
Consultants in Healthcare
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DID YOU SEE THIS?